LGBTQ2 for August 28

Before the 1900s to The Suffragettes

430, Africa – St. Augustine of Hippo (November 13, 354 – August 28, 430) dies. He was an early Christian theologian and philosopher whose writings influenced the development of Western Christianity and Western philosophy. He was the bishop of Hippo Regius in north Africa and is viewed as one of the most important Fathers in Western Christianity for his writings in the Patristic Era. Among his most important works are The City of God and ConfessionsSome of his writings in “Confessions” reveal his attraction to the same-sex.

1603, Italy – During a trial in which Italian painter Caravaggio (September 29, 1571 – July 18, 1610) was charged with libel when Baglione testified that he had a male lover. Baglione’s painting of “Divine Love” has also been seen as a visual accusation of sodomy against Caravaggio. Caravaggio was an Italian painter active in RomeNaplesMalta, and Sicily between 1592 (1595?) and 1610. His paintings combine a realistic observation of the human state, both physical and emotional, with a dramatic use of lighting, and they had a formative influence on Baroque painting. Since the 1970s both art scholars and historians have debated the inferences of homoeroticism in Caravaggio’s works as a way to better understand the man.

1814, Ireland – Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (August 28, 1814 – February 7,1873) is born in Dublin. He wrote vampire fiction, predating Bram Stoker‘s Dracula (1897) by 26 years. His best known, written 25 years before “Dracula,” is “Carmilla,” a story of a lesbian vampire who preyed on young women,

1825, Germany – Karl Heinrich Ulrichs (28 August 1825 – 14 July 1895), German jurist and activist, was born in Aurich, Germany. He would become one of the earliest activists in Germany to attempt to abolish the German sodomy law. In 1862, Ulrichs, a lawyer, theologian, and pioneer of the modern gay rights movement, described his own homosexuality as anima muliebris virili corpore inclusa – a female psyche confined in a male body. “I may have a beard, and manly limbs and body,” he writes in Latin “yet confined by these, I am and remain a woman”. Ulrichs’ fusion of gay and gender identities dominates discussion of transsexualism for almost a century, and it remains a widespread popular belief that trans women are gay men dressed in female clothes.

1833

By declaration of the British Parliament, slavery was banned throughout the British Empire.

1850

Wagner’s opera, “Lohengrin,” was performed for the first time.

1920, Germany -The first post-WWI general membership meeting of the Scientific Humanitarian Committee passes a motion to establish connections with homosexual organizations in other countries.

1921 – Nancy Kulp (August 28, 1921 – February 3, 1991), famous for her role as Miss Jane Hathaway on “The Beverly Hillbillies,” is born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. After the show’s cancellation, Kulp ran for state office in Pennsylvania; she lost the election. Kulp lived her life completely in the closet. Her lesbianism was not publicly acknowledged until after her death from cancer in Palm Springs on February 3, 1991. After her retirement from acting and teaching, she moved first to a farm in Connecticut and later to Palm Springs, California, where she became involved in several charity organizations, including the Humane Society of the Desert, the Desert Theatre League, and United Cerebral Palsy.[6] Later in life, Kulp indicated to author Boze Hadleigh in a 1989 interview that she was a lesbian. “As long as you reproduce my reply word for word, and the question, you may use it…. I’d appreciate it if you’d let me phrase the question. There is more than one way. Here’s how I would ask it: ‘Do you think that opposites attract?’ My own reply would be that I’m the other sort – I find that birds of a feather flock together. That answers your question.”

The Friends of Dorothy Era and The Hayes Code

1950s The Decade the public learned heterosexual women wanted sex

1957 – Gender-bending lesbian and Jewish folk/punk singer/songwriter Phranc (August 28, 1957) is born. Phranc is the stage name of Susan Gottlieb. Phranc began her performing career in the late 1970s and early 1980s punk scene in Los Angeles. She had a bleached blonde crewcut and wore male attire, creating an androgynous persona for her first band, Nervous Gender, which formed in 1978. She lives in Santa Monica, California with her partner and children.

August 28, 1957

U.S. Senator Strom Thurmond of South Carolina began a 24-hour and 18-minute non-stop filibuster – the longest ever by a lone senator – in an unsuccessful attempt to derail passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1957.

The Civil Rights 60s: When the Boomers were under 30

1963 – The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom takes place. Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. gives his “I have a Dream” speech. Openly gay Bayard Rustin (March 17, 1912 – August 24, 1987) was the march’s prime organizer, gathered at the Lincoln Memorial to hear songs by Mahalia Jackson, Joan Baez and Peter, Paul & Mary. The climax of the event was the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. giving what became known as his “I have a dream” speech.

1965 – Keith Boykin (born August 28, 1965), African-American activist and author, is born in St. Louis, Missouri. As if a forecast of his future activism, his birthday and Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I have a Dream Speech” share the same day. Working in the Clinton Administration, Boykin held the positions of Special Assistant to the President and Director of News Analysis, and Director of Specialty Media. In 2001, Boykin founded the National Black Justice Coalition, the largest African-American GLBT rights organization in America. Boykin has authored several books: “One More River to Cross: Black and Gay in America” (1996), “Respecting the Soul: Daily Reflections for Black Lesbians and Gays” (1999), and “Beyond the Down Low: Sex, Lies, and Denial in Black America” (2005).

Feminist, Gay Liberation and Lesbian Separatists: Civil Rights

1970 – Police in New York force their way into The Haven, a private, unisex non-alcohol gay club. It was the third of four raids on the club that would take place in a two-week period. Six were arrested, detained overnight, and released the next morning. Between these and other raids, over 300 homosexuals were arrested during the month of August. There were also cases of threats and harassment. New York City was sued for false arrest and harassment in three of the cases. All other cases were dismissed.

1970 – The Gay Liberation Front, Radicalesbians, and other gay activists hold a protest at NYU after the campus administration cancelled a series of dances at NYU’s Weinstein Hall when they learned a gay organization was sponsoring them. After a discussion with the dean they were allowed to use the property. The dean had been called by campus police who arrived to break up the demonstration.

On August 28th, 1971, approximately one hundred individuals from Toronto Gay Action, the Montreal Front de Libération Homosexuel, the Homophile Association at the University of Toronto, and the Gays of Ottawa gathered on Parliament Hill to protest the ongoing discrimination of homosexuals in Canada. A similar demonstration was held on the same day in Vancouver for those who could not travel to Ottawa. 

We Demand is a 13-page document including 10 demands for public policy changes to end all remaining forms of state sanctioned discrimination against homosexuals in Canada written by several queer individuals from the aforementioned organisations. As the letter states, “[i]n our daily lives we are still confronted with discrimination, police harassment, exploitation, and pressures to conform which deny our sexuality. That prejudice against homosexual people pervades society is, in no small way, attributable to practices of the Federal government.” A critique of the 1969 amendment, it addressed how the limitation to male adults above the age of 21 engaging in anal sex in the privacy of their own home—many of whom, we must add, did not enjoy this privilege of privacy—did not address the myriad ways in which homosexual men and women continued to face both implicit and violent forms of discrimination in our society.

August 28, 1972

In New York City, David Bowie and the Spiders from Mars debuted at Carnegie Hall.

August 28, 1973

Elton John was up big (74-34) with “Saturday Night’s Alright For Fighting”.

The Genderfuck Apathetics vs Yuppies : Aids the new STD on the list

1980

Queen released the single “Another One Bites The Dust”.

1981 – The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) first announces a sudden, unusual increase in cases of Kaposi’s sarcoma, the first sign of the worldwide epidemic of what would eventually be called HIV/AIDS.

1982 – First “Gay Games” are held at Kezar Stadium in San Francisco. 1,600 people participated and 50,000 people attended. At that time it was still called the “Gay Olympics” until the U. S. Olympic Committee sued for trademark infringement and won. Author Rita Mae Brown (born 28 November 1944) hosted the opening ceremonies. The Gay Games is the world’s largest sporting and cultural event specifically for lesbiangaybisexual, and transgender athletes, artists and musicians, founded by Tom WaddellRikki Streicher, and others. , Gay Games X will be in Paris 2018.

1989 – A law took effect in Texas that requires that real estate agents tell potential buyers or tenants if the person who previously occupied a property had AIDS.

90s: Listserves and Email distribution replaces telephone trees for activism

1993 – Keith Douglas Pruitt and another gay man were attacked in Manhattan. Pruitt once played a part on the soap opera “As the World Turns.” Pruitt required 14 stitches in his head. Three men from New Jersey were arrested and charged with the attack.

1994 – The first Lesbian and Gay Parade in Tokyo drew 1,134 participants, according to organizers.

1996 – In response to threats to out him after the city of Tempe, Arizona granted $1,500 in fee waivers to the annual gay pride festival, Mayor Neil Giuliano  (born October 26, 1956) comes out in an interview with the Tempe Daily News Tribune. He was named to the OUT 100 by OUT Magazine, which notes the top 100 people in gay culture in the US. While he was Mayor in 2003, Tempe was named an “All American-City,” an award honoring local governments demonstrating success in problem solving. He was named Tempe Humanitarian of the year in 2014.

1998 – The Gay and Lesbian Fund for Colorado, a fund of the Gill Foundation, announced $195,950 in grants to 22 Colorado organizations.

Post 9/11 – From “gay and lesbian” to “lesbigay” to “Lgbt/Lgbtq/Lgbtq2”

2002 – Nevada teen Derek Henkle (born in 1983 ) settles a lawsuit (Henkle v. Gregory, 150 F. Supp.2d 1067 (D Nev. 2001) against the Washoe County School District for $451,000. The settlement is believed to be the largest pre-trial award ever in this kind of case. Derek’s suit alleged that administrators in three separate schools failed to protect him from years of being beaten, spat upon, called names and threatened with a lasso because he is gay.

2007 – The world discovers that U.S. Senator Larry Craig had been arrested for lewd conduct in the men’s bathroom at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport on June 11, 2007, and entered a guilty plea to a lesser charge of disorderly conduct on August 8, 2007.

2021

https://www.kff.org/coronavirus-covid-19/press-release/two-new-kff-reports-take-a-closer-look-at-the-covid-19-pandemic-and-the-lgbt-community-from-the-impact-on-mental-health-to-vaccination-status/Two New KFF Reports Take a Closer Look at the COVID-19 Pandemic and the LGBT Community, From the Impact on Mental Health to Vaccination Status | KFFTwo new KFF reports provide new and updated data on the experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people during the COVID-19 pandemic, featuring data showing the impact on mental health and COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor data on vaccine uptake within the community. The two reports add important context to the limited but growing body<span class=”readmore-ellipsis”>…</span><a href=”https://www.kff.org/coronavirus-covid-19/press-release/two-new-kff-reports-take-a-closer-look-at-the-covid-19-pandemic-and-the-lgbt-community-from-the-impact-on-mental-health-to-vaccination-status/” class=”see-more light-beige no-float inline-readmore”>More</a></p>www.kff.org

https://www.sltrib.com/opinion/commentary/2021/08/27/carlysle-porter-hollands/Carlysle Porter: Holland’s speech places anti-LGBT rules ahead of other LDS commandmentsCarlysle Porter writes that Holland’s BYU speech places anti-LGBT rules ahead of other LDS commandments.www.sltrib.com

https://inews.co.uk/opinion/lgbt-afghans-evacuation-kabul-uk-government-failed-afghanistan-1171844LGBT Afghans will not be saved in this evacuation – but the UK government began failing them years agoAs I forwarded on the details of people begging for help, I wondered how on earth it had come to thisinews.co.uk

sources cited:

Today in LGBT History – August 28 | Ronni Sanlo

What Happened on this Day in Queer History – August 28

The Lavender Effect

Our Daily Elvis

LGBTQ2 for August 21

1869 –

Walt Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892)wrote to Peter Doyle on this date: “My love for you is indestructible, and since that night and morning has returned more than before.”

1872,

UK – Aubrey Beardsley  (August 21, 1872 – March 16, 1898) was born in Brighton, England. More than any other artist of his time, Beardsley epitomized the Art Nouveau style. As a young man he would walk down the boulevards of Paris arm in arm with his mother, his makeup far more dazzling than hers. Although Beardsley was associated with the homosexualclique that included Oscar Wilde  (16 October 1854 – 30 November 1900)and other English aesthetes, the details of his sexuality remain in question. He was generally regarded as asexual. His association with Oscar Wilde ruined him and he died of tuberculosis three years after Wilde was sentenced to prison.

1923

SexPhobia Laws: In Kalamazoo, Michigan, an ordinance was passed forbidding dancers from gazing into the eyes of their partner.

1928 – James “John” Finley Gruber (August 21, 1928 – February 27, 2011) was an American teacher and early LGBT rights activist. Gruber helped to document the early LGBT movement through interviews with historians, participating in a panel discussion in San Francisco in 2000 commemorating the 50th anniversary of the founding of Mattachine and appearing in the 2001 documentary film Hope Along the Wind about the life of Harry Hay (April 7, 1912 – October 24, 2002). Growing up Gruber considered himself bisexual and was involved with both men and women. His father, a former vaudevillian turned music teacher, relocated the family to Los Angeles in 1936. Gruber enlisted in the United States Marine Corps in 1946 at the age of 18 and was honorably discharged in 1949. Using his G.I. Billbenefits, Gruber studied English literature at Occidental College in Los Angeles. Gruber suffered increasingly ill health for several years before his death on February 27, 2011, at his home in Santa Clara.

1929, Mexico – Bisexual Frida Kahlo (July 6, 1907 – July 13, 1954) marries Diego Rivera. She was a Mexican painter, who mostly painted self-portraits. Inspired by Mexican popular culture, she employed a naïve folk art style to explore questions of identity, post colonialism, gender, class, and race in Mexican society. Her work has been celebrated internationally as emblematic of Mexican national and indigenous traditions, and by feminists for what is seen as its uncompromising depiction of the female experience and form. Kahlo was mainly known as Rivera’s wife until the late 1970s, when her work was rediscovered by art historians and political activists. By the early 1990s, she had become not only a recognized figure in art history, but also regarded as an icon for Chicanos, the Feminism movement, and the LGBTQ movement. Kahlo’s work has been celebrated internationally as emblematic of Mexican national andIndigenoustraditions, and by feminists for what is seen as its uncompromising depiction of the female experience and form.

1935 – Mart Crowley (born August 21, 1935) is an American playwright. He worked for a number of television production companies in Hollyhwood before meeting Natalie Wood on the set of her film Splendor in the Grass.Wood hired him as her assistant, primarily to give him free time to work on his gay-themed play The Boys in the Band,which opened off-Broadway on April 14, 1968 and enjoyed a run of 1,000 performances.Crowley has appeared in at least three documentaries: The Celluloid Closet (1995), about the depiction of homosexuality in cinema; Dominick Dunne: After the Party (2007), a biography of Crowley’s friend and producer Dominick Dunne; and Making the Boys (2011), a documentary about the making of The Boys in the Band. Crowley is openly gay.

1936, Spain – Luisa Isabel Alvarez de Toledo y Maura, 21st Duchess of Medina Sidonia, Grandee of Spain (August 21, 1936 – March 7, 2008) was nicknamed La Duquesa Rojaor The Red Duchess. She was the 21st Duchess of the ducal family of Medina-Sidonia, one of the most prestigious noble families and Grandees of Spain. Eleven hours before her death, on March 7, 2008, Luisa Isabel married her longtime partner and secretary since 1983, Liliana Maria Dahlmann in a civil ceremony on her deathbed. Today, the Dowager Duchess Liliana Maria,her legal widow, serves as life-president of the Fundación Casa Medina Sidonia.

1944, Germany – Felice Schragenheim (March 9, 1922 – December 31, 1944), a young Jewish resistance fighter in Germany, was sent to a concentration camp in Poland on this date. Her love story with Lilly Wust, a German wife of a Nazi, is portrayed in the 1999 film Aimee & Jaguar and in a book of the same name by Erica Fischer. It is also the subject of the 1997 documentary Love Story: Berlin 1942.

1965

Sonny & Cher once again had the #1 song with “I Got You Babe”.

1970

Huey Newton, co-founder of the Black Panthers, publicly announces his support of gay rights, stating his “solidarity” with the “Gay Power” movement. 

1971

Arthur Brown’s Kingdom Come, Hawkwind, Duster Bennett, Brewers Droop, Indian Summer, Graphite, (and second from the bottom on the bill) Queen all appeared at the Tregye Festival Truro, Cornwall, England.

Olivia Newton-John had the top Adult Contemporary song for the third week with the Bob Dylan song “If Not For You”.

Canada – In Ottawa, “We Demand,” a brief prepared by the Toronto Gay Action and sponsored by Canadian gay groups, is presented to the federal government. It calls for law reform and changes to public policy relating to homosexuals.

1980

Gilbert and Sullivan’s, The Pirates of Penzance opened on Broadway with Linda Ronstadt  and began pirate craze.

1982

 the Go-Go’s moved up to number 8 with “Vacation” on the USA song charts, and on the LP Charts, moved from 42 to 9 with Vacation

1983 – The musical version of “La Cage Aux Folles” opens on Broadway to rave reviews and $4 million in advance ticket sales. With a book written by Harvey Fierstein (born June 6, 1954) and lyrics and music by Jerry Herman(born July 10, 1931), La Cage is a romantic musical comedy based on a popular French film about two male lovers, the manager and the leading star of a nightclub featuring female impersonators.

1987

The movie “Dirty Dancing” was released in the U.S.

The Soundtrack to “Dirty Dancing” was released.

The Blow Monkeys cover of Leslie Gore’s You Don’t Own Me…

1989 –

The National Association of State Boards of Education reports that only twenty-four states require AIDS education in schools, and eighteen of those suggest abstinence as the only method of avoiding the disease. Only three programs require teachers to discuss the use of condoms in their programs.

 Lucie McKinney, the widow of Congressman Stewart McKinney (R-CT) (January 30, 1931 – May 7, 1987), the first congressman to die of complications from AIDS, challenges his will in court because he left a car and a 40% share of his Washington, DC house to his lover Arnold Dennison. McKinney’s physician speculated that McKinney became infected with HIVin 1979 as the result of blood transfusions during heart surgery.McKinney was known by friends to be bisexual, though his family said this was not the case, which raised the issue of how he had contracted the disease. Anti-gay prejudice at the time of McKinney’s death in 1987 may have promoted a disingenuous approach to speculations on the cause of McKinney’s HIV infection. Arnold Denson, the man with whom McKinney had been living in Washington, said that he had been McKinney’s lover, and that he believed McKinney was already infected when Denson met him.

1993

“The Bodyguard” Soundtrack was #7 one the LP charts for Whitney Houston

1994

Interrupting her concert at the Arrowhead Pond in Anaheim, California, Whitney Houston asks that the spotlight be turned on Justin and Sydney Simpson, whose father O.J. Simpson is currently on trial for murdering their mother, Nicole.

1994 – Rikki Streicher (1922 – Aug. 21,1994) dies of cancer at age 68 in San Francisco. She opened Maud’s, America’s oldest continuously operating lesbian bar, in 1966 and Amanda’s, a lesbian dance club that opened in 1978. Maud’s closed in 1989 because of financial problems. Streicher also helped organize the Gay Games in San Francisco in 1986. Streicher was born in 1922. She served in the military and lived in Los Angeles in the 1940s, where she spent time in the gay bars of that city. She also frequented the gay bars of North Beach in San FranciscoButch-femme roles were very fixed at that time. Streicher, then identified as butch, and was photographed in 1945 in a widely published image, sitting in Oakland‘s Claremont Resort with other lesbians, wearing a suit and tie.In 1966, Streicher opened Maud’s, originally called “Maud’s Study”, or “The Study”, a lesbian bar on Cole St. in the Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco. The following year, the Haight-Ashbury would become the epicenter of the hippie movement during the 1967 Summer of Love. Maud’s, said one historian, served to “bridge the gap between San Francisco’s lesbian community and its hippie generation.” Because women were not allowed to be employed as bartenders in San Francisco until 1971, Streicher had to either tend bar herself or hire male bartenders. The bar quickly became a popular gathering place for San Francisco lesbians and bisexual women. One notable customer of Maud’s was singer Janis Joplin(January 19, 1943 – October 4, 1970). Activists Del Martin(May 5, 1921 – August 27, 2008)and Phyllis Lyon(born November 10, 1924)were also early patrons of Maud’s. In 1978, at the height of the disco era, Streicher opened a more spacious bar and dance club on Valencia Street in San Francisco’s Mission District called Amelia’s, named after Amelia Earhart. Streicher died of cancer in 1994, and was survived by her partner, Mary Sager.

1996 – Intel announces that the company will begin offering domestic partner benefits.

1996 – Denver Colorado’s Career Service Authority votes 5-0 to extend health insurance benefits to the partners and children of gay and lesbian city employees. The plan did not cover unmarried heterosexual couples. Mayor Wellington Webb announced that he would approve the plan, which had the support of the majority of the city council.

1997 – Irving Cooperberg, (1932 – Aug. 21, 1997), co-founder of the New York City Lesbian and Gay Community Services Center, dies of complications from AIDS at age 65. Mr. Cooperberg, who was born and raised in Brooklyn, quit college in 1951, joined the Army and served in Korea. Real estate investments in Manhattan and Fire Island Pines, beginning in the early 1960’s, made him wealthy. In 1973, he attended a service at the embryonic gay and lesbian synagogue, Congregation Beth Simchat Torah, in Greenwich Village. He soon volunteered to serve on its board. Because of his role at the synagogue, Mr. Cooperberg was drawn into the effort in the early ’80’s to establish a citywide lesbian and gay center with a full complement of services. One of the first of its kind in the country, it was to occupy the former Food and Maritime High School at 208 West 13th Street. Mr. Cooperberg was elected the center’s first president in July 1983 and served until May 1987. He is survived by his companion, Lou Rittmaster.

1998 – According to a survey by the Arizona Department of Public Safety, hate crimes in the first part of 1998 were down 15% but gay males were the second most commonly targeted group with twenty incidents. Ten incidents against lesbians were reported.

1998 – Elton Jackson was found guilty by a jury in Virginia of the murder of Andrew Smith. He was given a sentence of life in prison. Police suspected him in the murder of twelve gay men.

2002 – Twenty lesbian and gay survivors whose partners died in the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center were told they would receive workers’ compensation under a new state law.

2003 – Former Georgia representative Bob Barr, the man who wrote the Defense of Marriage Act that prevents same-sex couples from receiving federal benefits, said it would be a mistake to amend the Constitution to ban gay marriage.

2004 – A Louisiana state judge rules that the proposed constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriages and civil unions was unconstitutional and must be taken off the September 18 ballot.

2006

German prosecutors announced that they had decided against opening an investigation into Madonna after she performed a controversial mock crucifixion scene at a concert on August 20.

2008

The Coquille Indian Tribe in Oregon legalizes same-sex marriage which is not recognized by the state.

Hallmark Greeting Cards based in Kansas City introduces line of same-sex wedding cards.

2012

Lisa Marie Presley made her Grand Ole Opry debut where she wowed the sold-out audience by performing three songs from her current album, “Storm & Grace”.

sources cited:

Today in LGBT History – August 21 | Ronni Sanlo

Daily Elvis: August 21

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