LGBTQ2 for september 6

Before the 1900s to The Suffragettes

1860 – Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935), known as the “mother” of Social Work, was a pioneer American settlement activist/reformer, social worker, public philosopher, sociologist, author, and leader in women’s suffrage and world peace. She co-founded, with her early partner Ellen Gates Starr, the first settlement house in the United States, Chicago’s Hull Housethat would later become known as one of the most famous settlement houses in America. In an era when presidents such as Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson identified themselves as reformers and social activists, Addams was one of the most prominent reformers of the Progressive Era. She helped America address and focus on issues that were of concern to mothers, such as the needs of children, local public health, and world peace. In her essay “Utilization of Women in City Government,” Jane Addams noted the connection between the workings of government and the household, stating that many departments of government, such as sanitation and the schooling of children, could be traced back to traditional women’s roles in the private sphere. Thus, these were matters of which women would have more knowledge than men, so women needed the vote to best voice their opinions. She said that if women were to be responsible for cleaning up their communities and making them better places to live, they needed to be able to vote to do so effectively. Addams became a role model for middle-class women who volunteered to uplift their communities. She is increasingly being recognized as a member of the American pragmatistschool of philosophy, and is known by many as the first woman “public philosopher in the history of the United States. In 1889 she co-founded Hull House, and in 1920 she was a co-founder for the ACLU. In 1931 she became the first American woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, and is recognized as the founder of the social workprofession in the United States. Generally, Addams was close to a wide set of other women and was very good at eliciting their involvement from different classes in Hull House’s programs. Throughout her life Addams had significant romantic relationships which offered her the time and energy to pursue her social work while being supported emotionally and romantically. From her exclusively romantic relationships with women, she would most likely be described as a lesbian in contemporary terms, similar to many leading figures in the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom of the time. She “shared her life for 40 years” with her beloved companion Mary Rozet Smith (December 23, 1868 – February 22, 1934).

1882 – John Powell (September 6, 1882 – August 15, 1963) is born in Richmond, Virginia. A world-renowned concert pianist and composer, his partner in life was fellow composer Daniel Gregory Mason (November 20, 1873 – December 4, 1953.

The Friends of Dorothy Era and The Hayes Code

1935 -New York University professor Dr. Louis W. Max tells a meeting of the American Psychological Association that he has successfully treated a “partially fetishistic” homosexual neurosis with electric shock therapy delivered at “intensities considerably higher than those usually employed on human subjects.” Max’s presentation is the first documented instance of aversion therapy to “cure” homosexuality.

1950s The Decade the public learned heterosexual women wanted sex

The Civil Rights 60s: When the Boomers were under 30

1963 – Bayard Rustin (March 17, 1912 – August 24, 1987) appears on the cover of LIFE Magazine with A. Philip Randolph as the organizers of the March on Washington. Rustin, who is openly gay, is fully supported by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Feminist, Gay Liberation and Lesbian Separatists: Civil Rights

1971 – The annual convention of the National Organization for Women passes a resolution acknowledging “oppression of lesbians as a legitimate concern of feminism.”

The Genderfuck Apathetics vs Yuppies : Aids the new STD on the list

90s: Listserves and Email distribution replaces telephone trees for activism

Post 9/11 – From “gay and lesbian” to “lesbigay” to “Lgbt/Lgbtq/Lgbtq2”

2005 – The California legislature becomes the first to pass a bill allowing marriage between same-sex couples. Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger vetoes the bill. The same thing happens in 2007.

2015, Guatemala – Out lesbian human rights activist Sandra Moran (born April 29, 1960) is voted into Guatemalan congress. Sandra Moran joined Guatemala’s human rights movement as a high school student, and later merged her activism with music, playing with the revolutionary music band, Kin Lalat. During much of Guatemala’s civil war, Sandra lived in exile—in Mexico, Nicaragua and Canada—and participated in solidarity work for Guatemala. Sandra is Guatemala’s first openly gay member of Congress.

6th of September 2018,

the Supreme Court of India overthrew section 377 of the Indian penal code, a decision that will have a direct impact of the lives of millions of LGBT person. As soon as the verdict was pronounced thousands and thousands of lesbians and gays thronged the streets of small cities and metropolises to express their joy. Most of them did need to wear masks. They will not need to anymore, at least not for fear of the law.

cited sources

Today in LGBT History – September 6 | Ronni Sanlo

The Lavender Effect

Our Daily Elvis

LGBTQ2 for August 24

Before the 1900s to The Suffragettes

79 – Mount Vesuvius erupts, burying Pompeii and preserving the city. In a macabre way, it was fortunate for it saved the homoerotic frescos that Christianity would no doubt have destroyed. It also saved the graffiti found centuries later by archaeologists. When the artwork was first discovered, people found it so scandalous that much of it was locked away in the National Museum of Naples, where it remained hidden from view for over 100 years. In 2000, the art was finally made view-able to the public, but minors must be accompanied by an adult.

August 24, 1891

Inventor Thomas Edison filed for a patent on his motion picture camera. Called a kinetoscope, the camera took pictures on a band of film that could be viewed by peeping into a box.

The Friends of Dorothy Era and The Hayes Code

1932, Germany – Five Nazis are convicted of political murder on August 22nd. On this day, Edmund Heines (July 21, 1897, Munich –June 30, 1934), a Nazi leader, organizes a protest against their death sentence. Less than two years later, Heines is discovered naked in bed, by Hitler himself, with another man. Hitler orders Heines to be shot. Hitler’s chauffeur Erich Kempka claimed in a 1946 interview that Edmund Heines was caught in bed with an unidentified 18-year-old male when he was arrested during the Night of the Long Knives, although Kempka did not actually witness it. The boy was later identified as Heines’ young driver Erich Schiewek. According to Kempka, Heines refused to cooperate and get dressed. When the SS detectives reported this to Hitler, he went to Heines’s room and ordered him to get dressed within five minutes or risk being shot. After five minutes had passed by, Heines still had not complied with the order. As a result, Hitler became so furious that he ordered some SS men to take Heines and the boy outside to be executed.[

1950s The Decade the public learned heterosexual women wanted sex

1953 – The summary of Kinsey’s “Sexual Behavior in the Human Female” is published in Time Magazine. The study includes lesbian behavior.

1954, UK – The Wolfenden Committee is appointed to investigate laws in Britain relating to homosexual offenses.

1957, UK – Actor Stephen Fry  (August 24, 1957), most famous for playing Oscar Wilde in “Wilde,” was born in Hampstead, London. In addition to his numerous film credits, Fry is also the author of “The Liar” (1991), “The Hippopotamus” (1994), and “Making History” (1996).

The Civil Rights 60s: When the Boomers were under 30

1969 – The fourth annual North American Conference of Homophile Organizations begins in Kansas City. It includes twenty-four independent gay liberation organizations.

Feminist, Gay Liberation and Lesbian Separatists: Civil Rights

1970 – The New York Times runs a front-page story with the headline “Homosexuals in Revolt”. The article reports “a new mood now taking hold among the nation’s homosexuals. In growing numbers, they are publicly identifying themselves as homosexuals, taking a measure of pride in that identity and seeking militantly to end what they see as society’s persecution of them.”

1972 – The Greater Cincinnati Gay Society files suit to require the Secretary of State to grant them articles of incorporation. Their request was denied on the grounds that homosexual acts were illegal. The court agreed that the state was not required to grant incorporation to an organization that promotes the acceptance of homosexuality.

1974

On the USA LP Charts, Elton John remained third with Caribou

August 24, 1975

Queen started recording ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ at Rockfield studio’s in Monmouth, Wales, (the song was recorded over three weeks). Freddie Mercury had mentally prepared the song beforehand and directed the band throughout the sessions. May, Mercury, and Taylor sang their vocal parts continually for ten to twelve hours a day, resulting in 180 separate overdubs.

The Genderfuck Apathetics vs Yuppies : Aids the new STD on the list

1985

On the USA song charts dropped to two: “Shout” by Tears for Fears

1987 – Bayard Rustin (March 17, 1912 – August 24, 1987) , an African-American gay man who organized the March on Washington for Civil Rights in 1964, dies of cardiac arrest in New York City. He was an American leader in social movements for civil rightssocialismnonviolence, and gay rights. He was born and raised in Pennsylvania, where his family was involved in civil rights work. In 1936, he moved to HarlemNew York City, where he earned a living as a nightclub and stage singer. He continued activism for civil rights.

1988 – Actor Leonard Frey (September 4, 1938 – August 24, 1988) dies of complications from AIDS at age 49. Frey received critical acclaim in 1968 for his performance as Harold in off-Broadway‘s The Boys in the Band. He would go on to appear alongside the rest of the original cast in the 1970 film version, directed by William Friedkin. He is best remembered for his Academy Award-nominated performance in Fiddler on the Roof.

1989

The Who performed Tommy at the Universal Amphitheatre, Los Angeles with special guests Steve Winwood, Elton John, Phil Collins, Patti LaBelle and Billy Idol.

90s: Listserves and Email distribution replaces telephone trees for activism

1990

Judas Priest successfully defended themselves against a lawsuit, after two fans attempted suicide while listening to the Stained Class album. Both fans eventually died, one immediately from a shotgun blast, and the other on a second attempt three years later by a methadone overdose. The prosecution claimed that there were subliminal messages in the group’s music that caused the two seventeen year olds to carry out the suicide pact in 1985.

1993 – During a Holocaust remembrance, Oregon governor Barbara Roberts criticizes anti-gay ballot initiatives in the state.

1998

Producer Gene Page died after a long illness. Worked with Barbra Streisand, Barry White, The Righteous Brothers, Dobie Gray, Bob and Earl. Produced Whitney Houston’s ‘Greatest Love of All’ and Roberta Flack’s ‘Tonight I Celebrate My Love.’

Post 9/11 – From “gay and lesbian” to “lesbigay” to “Lgbt/Lgbtq/Lgbtq2”

2000 – A U.S. federal court of appeals rules that a transgender Mexican woman had reason to fear persecution and was entitled to asylum.

2004 – Vice President Dick Cheney told a GOP rally in Davenport, Iowa, that gay marriage should be left up to the states, a reversal of his previous statement on the subject and a return to his original position while running in 2000.

2010

George Michael pleaded guilty at Highbury Corner Magistrates’ Court in London to driving under the influence of drugs. The singer had been arrested in July when he was returning home from the London Gay Pride parade and crashed his car into the front of a Snappy Snaps store in Hampstead, North London.

2013

A Las Vegas mansion once owned by Liberace was sold for $500,000 to a British businessman. The ten-bedroom, two-bathroom home, built in 1962, sold for about $3 million more than that just seven years ago.

cited sources

Today in LGBT History   by Ronni Sanlo

The Lavender Effect

Our Daily Elvis

LGBTQ2 for August 22

1662, Spain – A leader of the Mexican Inquisition sent a letter to his supervisors in Spain complaining that the severe punishments given to sodomites had been ineffective. He noted that over 100 had been indicted, that a large number of the offenders were clergy, and that torture had been used to extract confessions.

1894, Denmark – Willem Arondeus (August 22, 1894 – July 1, 1943) is born. He was a Dutch artist and author, who joined the Dutch anti-Nazi resistance movement during World War II. He participated in the bombing of the Amsterdam public records office to hinder the Nazi German effort to identify Dutch Jews. Arondeus was caught and executed soon after his arrest. He was openly gay before the war and defiantly asserted his sexuality before his execution. In his last message before his execution, Arondeus, who had lived openly as a gay man before the war, asked his lawyer to “Let it be known that homosexuals are not cowards!”

1895, Hungary – László Ede Almásy de Zsadány et Törökszentmiklós (August 22, – March 22, 1951) is born. He was a Hungarian aristocratdesert exploreraviatorscout leader and sportsman who served as the basis for the protagonist in both Michael Ondaatje‘s novel The English Patient (1992) and the movie adaptation of the same name (1996). Letters discovered in 2010 in Germany written by Almásy prove that, unlike the fictionalized character of the film, he was in fact gay. His lover was a young soldier named Hans Entholt, who was an officer in the Wehrmacht and who was killed by stepping on a landmine. A staff member of the Heinrich Barth Institute for African Studies where the letters are located, also confirmed that “Egyptian princes were among Almásy’s lovers.” The letters confirmed that Almásy died from amoebic dysentery in 1951.

1914, France – Violette Morris (April 18, 1893 – April 26, 1944), marries a man on this day. She won two gold and one silver medals at the Women’s World Games in 1921–1922. Starting in 1936 she worked with the Gestapo during World War II. She was killed in 1944 in a Resistance-led ambush as a traitor to the French state. Morris was a gifted athlete, becoming the first French woman to excel at shot put and discus, and playing on two separate women’s football teams. She played for Fémina Sports from 1917 until 1919, and for Olympique de Paris from 1920 to 1926. Both teams were based in Paris. She also played on the French women’s national team. She was refused license renewal by the Fédération Française sportive Féminine (FFSF – French Women’s Athletic Federation) amid complaints of her bisexual lifestyle and was therefore barred from participating in the 1928 Summer Olympics. The agency cited her lack of morals, especially in light of the fact that one of her lovers, Raoul Paoli, made public her bisexuality. Paoli had recently left Morris after she had initially decided to undergo an elective mastectomy in order to fit into racing cars more easily. At the end of December 1935, Morris was recruited by the Sicherheitsdienst(Security Service), a wing of the infamous SS of Nazi Germany. She was invited, with honor, to attend the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin at the personal behest of Adolf Hitler. She was killed along a country road by members of a French resistance group on 26 April 1944, at the age of 51, while out driving with friends who were also collaborators.

1915, UK – Birth date of British actor Hugh Paddick  (August 22, 1915 – November 9, 2000)  in Hoddesdon, Hertfordshire. He was an English actor whose most notable role was in the 1960s BBC radio show Round the Horne, in sketches such as “Charles and Fiona” (as Charles) and “Julian and Sandy” (as Julian). Both he and Kenneth Williams are largely responsible for introducing the underground language polari to the British public. Paddick was gay and lived for over thirty years with his partner Francis. The two men were keen gardeners at their west London home. He was distantly related to Brian Paddick, Britain’s first openly gay police commander. Paddick died in Milton KeynesBuckinghamshire in November 2000, aged 85.

1927 – James Kirkwood Jr.  (August 22, 1924 – April 21, 1989) is born in Los Angeles. He was an American playwright, author and actor. In 1976 he received the Tony Award, the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Book of a Musical, and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for the Broadway hit A Chorus Line.

August 22, 1962

An early form of karaoke is introduced at the Radio Show at Earl’s Court in London, England. A new machine allows the integration of voice to guitars, tapes and even radio, making it possible to sing and play along with records.

1965 – David Peter Reimer is born (August 22, 1965 – May 4, 2004). He was a Canadian man born biologically male but  who was reassigned as female by Dr. John Money after his penis was destroyed in infancy by a botched circumcision. He committed suicide in 2004. In 955, Money (1921-2006), a sexologist and psychologist, introduced the concept of ‘gender role’ into the transsexual debate. Money later was heavily criticized over Reimer’s suicide. David Reimer, an identical twin, was mutilated at 8-months old in a botched circumcision and then surgically reassigned by Money and raised as a girl. But he never felt female on the inside (even though his parents followed Money’s advice and hid the fact of his birth sex from him), despite Money’s claims to the contrary. His life, especially at school, was sheer hell because others never really perceived him to be a girl either, despite his girl drag. By age 16, Reimer underwent a second reassignment at his own insistence so that he could live as the boy he knew himself to be. In the meantime, however, Money had convinced the medical establishment and the lay public, despite growing evidence to the contrary in his “girl” twin, that babies could be arbitrarily assigned a gender with no psychological consequences. Today, still, five children a day are surgically “corrected” at birth because of this one “case study” and Money’s defense of his handling of David’s life. With the help of Drs. Milton Diamond and H.K. Sigmundson, Reimer would finally tell the medical establishment the truth about his life in 1997 in the Archives of Adolescent and Pediatric Medicine, [“Sex reassignment at birth. Long-term review and clinical implications” Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med, Mar 1997; 151: 298 – 304.], challenging the firmly established medical and popular myth that gender was mostly a function of nurture rather than nature. Later that year, Reimer would work with author John Colapinto to tell his story to the lay public, first under a pseudonym, in Rolling Stone

1966 – The National Planning Conference of Homophile Organizations met in San Francisco. It was the first national convention of gay and lesbian organizations, and its name would later be changed to the North American Conference of Homophile Organizations.

August 22, 1970

Anne Murray‘s “Snowbird” enters Billboard’s Hot 100 on its way to a million seller, marking the first time in history that an American Gold record was awarded to a solo Canadian female.

Elton John signed with UNI, a division of MCA Records.

August 22, 1971

Bob Dylan, Peter, Paul & Mary and Joan Baez were at the Odeon Theatre in Edinburgh, Scotland.

1972 – John Wojtowicz and Sal Naturale attempted to rob the Chase Manhattan Bank in Brooklyn to get money for Wojtowicz’s lover’s sex change operation. Naturale was shot to death. The incident became the subject of the 1975 movie “Dog Day Afternoon” with Al Pacino. Wojtowicz was sentenced to 20 years.

1980

Queen performed at the Spectrum in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

1983 – Organizers of a Washington march, marking the 20th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, announce that no representatives from gay or lesbian rights groups will be allowed to speak. A group of lesbians and gay men stage a sit-in at the organizers’ office in response. Bayard Rustin, an openly gay man, was one of the primary organizers of the 1963 March.

1987

the usa song charts:

“Who’s That Girl” by Madonna became her sixth number one and 13th consecutive Top 10 song.  The track was from the soundtrack album of the motion picture of same name.

At five “I Want Your Sex” by George Michael,

1996

In an interview publishes by the St Petersburg Times (Florida, not Russia), openly gay Rep. Barney Frank said the outing of hypocrites was justified.

Gov. Kirk Fordice of Mississippi signs an executive order banning same-sex marriage.

The North Charleston, South Carolina, City Council revoked the license of a health club for gay and bisexual men on the grounds that it was a sexually oriented business.

1998

 Hundreds picket at the Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church to protest the Truth In Love newspaper ad campaign which claimed gays and lesbians can be “cured” by becoming Christians. The church in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, is a major player in spreading hatred for the gay community.

Elton John, playing the second of two shows at the Arrowhead Pond of Anaheim, is joined on stage by comedian Jim Carrey. They perform “Rocket Man” as a duet.

2001

U.S. Census figures showed that same-sex couples head nearly 600,000 homes in U.S., with gay or lesbian couple in nearly every county.

2007

Queen‘s guitarist Brian May was awarded a doctorate in Astronomy, 36 years after starting his thesis. May, who abandoned his studies to pursue a career in music, was told of his success after taking a three-hour exam to discuss his work. The 60-year-old, who handed in his 48,000-word tome earlier in the month, said: “You can call me Dr. May!”

2021

https://www.inc.com/jason-aten/with-9-words-tim-cook-just-explained-biggest-problem-with-facebook.htmlWith 9 Words, Tim Cook Just Explained the Biggest Problem With Facebook | Inc.comIt’s about the paradox of privacy and digital technology.

https://www.rmotoday.com/lifestyle-news/romanias-lgbt-community-sees-gains-ongoing-rights-struggle-4243158Romania’s LGBT community sees gains, ongoing rights struggle – RMOToday.comBUCHAREST, Romania (AP) — The last person jailed for being gay in Romania walked free in 1998. The country decriminalized homosexuality three years after that, in 2001, while reforming its laws to qualify for membership in the European Union.www.rmotoday.com

https://www.nbcnews.com/nbc-out/nbc-out-proud/tokyo-paralympic-games-welcomes-record-number-lgbtq-athletes-rcna1732Tokyo Paralympic Games welcomes record number of LGBTQ athletes<p>When the 2020 Paralympics kick off on Aug. 24, there will be at least <a href=”https://www.outsports.com/2021/8/16/22623849/lgbtq-paralympics-out-athletes-towww.nbcnews.com

https://www.losangelesblade.com/2021/08/21/gdansk-czestochowa-polands-lgbtq-marches-had-heavy-police-guard/Gdańsk & Częstochowa Poland’s LGBTQ marches had heavy police guardIn Gdańsk officials estimated there were approximately 3,500 participants protected by nearly 1,000 uniformed police & security forces.www.losangelesblade.com

cited sources

Today in LGBT History – August 22 | Ronni Sanlo

Daily Elvis: August 22

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