LGBTQ2 for August 24

Before the 1900s to The Suffragettes

79 – Mount Vesuvius erupts, burying Pompeii and preserving the city. In a macabre way, it was fortunate for it saved the homoerotic frescos that Christianity would no doubt have destroyed. It also saved the graffiti found centuries later by archaeologists. When the artwork was first discovered, people found it so scandalous that much of it was locked away in the National Museum of Naples, where it remained hidden from view for over 100 years. In 2000, the art was finally made view-able to the public, but minors must be accompanied by an adult.

August 24, 1891

Inventor Thomas Edison filed for a patent on his motion picture camera. Called a kinetoscope, the camera took pictures on a band of film that could be viewed by peeping into a box.

The Friends of Dorothy Era and The Hayes Code

1932, Germany – Five Nazis are convicted of political murder on August 22nd. On this day, Edmund Heines (July 21, 1897, Munich –June 30, 1934), a Nazi leader, organizes a protest against their death sentence. Less than two years later, Heines is discovered naked in bed, by Hitler himself, with another man. Hitler orders Heines to be shot. Hitler’s chauffeur Erich Kempka claimed in a 1946 interview that Edmund Heines was caught in bed with an unidentified 18-year-old male when he was arrested during the Night of the Long Knives, although Kempka did not actually witness it. The boy was later identified as Heines’ young driver Erich Schiewek. According to Kempka, Heines refused to cooperate and get dressed. When the SS detectives reported this to Hitler, he went to Heines’s room and ordered him to get dressed within five minutes or risk being shot. After five minutes had passed by, Heines still had not complied with the order. As a result, Hitler became so furious that he ordered some SS men to take Heines and the boy outside to be executed.[

1950s The Decade the public learned heterosexual women wanted sex

1953 – The summary of Kinsey’s “Sexual Behavior in the Human Female” is published in Time Magazine. The study includes lesbian behavior.

1954, UK – The Wolfenden Committee is appointed to investigate laws in Britain relating to homosexual offenses.

1957, UK – Actor Stephen Fry  (August 24, 1957), most famous for playing Oscar Wilde in “Wilde,” was born in Hampstead, London. In addition to his numerous film credits, Fry is also the author of “The Liar” (1991), “The Hippopotamus” (1994), and “Making History” (1996).

The Civil Rights 60s: When the Boomers were under 30

1969 – The fourth annual North American Conference of Homophile Organizations begins in Kansas City. It includes twenty-four independent gay liberation organizations.

Feminist, Gay Liberation and Lesbian Separatists: Civil Rights

1970 – The New York Times runs a front-page story with the headline “Homosexuals in Revolt”. The article reports “a new mood now taking hold among the nation’s homosexuals. In growing numbers, they are publicly identifying themselves as homosexuals, taking a measure of pride in that identity and seeking militantly to end what they see as society’s persecution of them.”

1972 – The Greater Cincinnati Gay Society files suit to require the Secretary of State to grant them articles of incorporation. Their request was denied on the grounds that homosexual acts were illegal. The court agreed that the state was not required to grant incorporation to an organization that promotes the acceptance of homosexuality.

1974

On the USA LP Charts, Elton John remained third with Caribou

August 24, 1975

Queen started recording ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ at Rockfield studio’s in Monmouth, Wales, (the song was recorded over three weeks). Freddie Mercury had mentally prepared the song beforehand and directed the band throughout the sessions. May, Mercury, and Taylor sang their vocal parts continually for ten to twelve hours a day, resulting in 180 separate overdubs.

The Genderfuck Apathetics vs Yuppies : Aids the new STD on the list

1985

On the USA song charts dropped to two: “Shout” by Tears for Fears

1987 – Bayard Rustin (March 17, 1912 – August 24, 1987) , an African-American gay man who organized the March on Washington for Civil Rights in 1964, dies of cardiac arrest in New York City. He was an American leader in social movements for civil rightssocialismnonviolence, and gay rights. He was born and raised in Pennsylvania, where his family was involved in civil rights work. In 1936, he moved to HarlemNew York City, where he earned a living as a nightclub and stage singer. He continued activism for civil rights.

1988 – Actor Leonard Frey (September 4, 1938 – August 24, 1988) dies of complications from AIDS at age 49. Frey received critical acclaim in 1968 for his performance as Harold in off-Broadway‘s The Boys in the Band. He would go on to appear alongside the rest of the original cast in the 1970 film version, directed by William Friedkin. He is best remembered for his Academy Award-nominated performance in Fiddler on the Roof.

1989

The Who performed Tommy at the Universal Amphitheatre, Los Angeles with special guests Steve Winwood, Elton John, Phil Collins, Patti LaBelle and Billy Idol.

90s: Listserves and Email distribution replaces telephone trees for activism

1990

Judas Priest successfully defended themselves against a lawsuit, after two fans attempted suicide while listening to the Stained Class album. Both fans eventually died, one immediately from a shotgun blast, and the other on a second attempt three years later by a methadone overdose. The prosecution claimed that there were subliminal messages in the group’s music that caused the two seventeen year olds to carry out the suicide pact in 1985.

1993 – During a Holocaust remembrance, Oregon governor Barbara Roberts criticizes anti-gay ballot initiatives in the state.

1998

Producer Gene Page died after a long illness. Worked with Barbra Streisand, Barry White, The Righteous Brothers, Dobie Gray, Bob and Earl. Produced Whitney Houston’s ‘Greatest Love of All’ and Roberta Flack’s ‘Tonight I Celebrate My Love.’

Post 9/11 – From “gay and lesbian” to “lesbigay” to “Lgbt/Lgbtq/Lgbtq2”

2000 – A U.S. federal court of appeals rules that a transgender Mexican woman had reason to fear persecution and was entitled to asylum.

2004 – Vice President Dick Cheney told a GOP rally in Davenport, Iowa, that gay marriage should be left up to the states, a reversal of his previous statement on the subject and a return to his original position while running in 2000.

2010

George Michael pleaded guilty at Highbury Corner Magistrates’ Court in London to driving under the influence of drugs. The singer had been arrested in July when he was returning home from the London Gay Pride parade and crashed his car into the front of a Snappy Snaps store in Hampstead, North London.

2013

A Las Vegas mansion once owned by Liberace was sold for $500,000 to a British businessman. The ten-bedroom, two-bathroom home, built in 1962, sold for about $3 million more than that just seven years ago.

cited sources

Today in LGBT History   by Ronni Sanlo

The Lavender Effect

Our Daily Elvis

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started
%d bloggers like this: