LGBTQ2 for February 18



BCE to The Suffragettes

1735

The first opera performed in America. The work was “Flora” (or “Hob in the Well”) and was presented in Charleston, SC.

1840 – Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) He was an American essayistpoetphilosopherabolitionistnaturalisttax resisterdevelopment criticsurveyor, and historian. A leading transcendentalist Thoreau is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay “Civil Disobedience” (originally published as “Resistance to Civil Government”), an argument for disobedience to an unjust state. On this day, he writes about same-sex love in his journal. ”All romance is grounded on friendship” is one of his many references to love and friendship between men. Thoreau never married and was childless. He strove to portray himself as an ascetic puritan. However, his sexuality has long been the subject of speculation, including by his contemporaries. Critics have called him heterosexual, homosexual, or asexual. There is no evidence to suggest he had physical relations with anyone, man or woman. Some scholars have suggested that homoerotic sentiments run through his writings and concluded that he was homosexual.

02-18-1844 – 03-17-1927 Victorine Meurent – Born in Paris, France. She 

was a French painter and a famous model for painters. She is best known as the favorite model of Édouard Manet. She’s the nude in Manet’s painting Luncheon on the Grass. She was also an artist in her own right who regularly exhibited at the prestigious Paris Salon. By 1879, when Meurent exhibited at the Salon for the second time, she had become estranged from Manet and his circle. She was no longer welcome because of certain love affairs that had caused her to become the subject of unpleasant gossip. She 

was known to be l’amie intime (close friend) of Marie Pellegrin, a lesbian and courteasan. The last two decades of her life, Meurent lived with Marie Dufour. Meurent is a good example on how women artists were frequently excluded from art history and instead listed as the subject or inspirer of the male artist.

February 18, 1885

year after its publication in Canada and the UK, Mark Twain’s novel “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” was published in the U.S. for the first time.

1908 – Nancy Hamilton (July 27, 1908 – February 18, 1985) was an American actress, playwright, lyricist, director and producer. Hamilton was the lifelong partner of legendary actress Katharine Cornell (February 16, 1893 – June 9, 1974). Hamilton is perhaps best known as the lyricist for the popular song, “How High the Moon.

02-18-1917 – 02-23-2009 Tuulikki Pietilä – Born in Seattle, Washington. She was a Finnish-American graphic artist and professor at the Academy of Fine Arts, Helsinki, Finland. During her 

studies at the Fernand Léger Art Academy in Paris (1949-1953), she met her life partner, artist, and writer, Tove Jansson (August 9, 1914). The two women collaborated on many projects, including the Moomin books and comic strip, that became a television series and a theme park called Moomin World in Naantali, Finland. Jansson’s and Pietilä’s travels were filmed by Pietilä and have been made into several documentaries, including Haru, yksinäinen saari (Haru, the lonely island) (1998) and Tove ja Tooti Euroopassa (Tove and Tooti in Europe) (2004).

02-18-1933 Yoko Ono – Born in Tokyo, Japan. She is a Japanese multimedia artist, singer, 

songwriter, and peace activist. Ono is also known as the second wife and widow of John Lennon. She has long been a supporter of LGBT rights. In 2004, her song Every Man Has a Woman Who Loves Him, she changed to a gay-friendly version Every Man Has a Man Who Loves Him and Every Woman Has a Woman Who Loves Her. It became both a political statement, a tribute to the LGBT community, and became a hit at the dance clubs. In May 2009, she designed a T-shirt for the second year for Fashion Against AIDS campaign and collection of HIV/AIDS awareness, NGO Designers Against AIDS, and H&M, with the statement “Imagine Peace” depicted in 21 languages.

1934 – Audre Lorde (February 18, 1934 – November 17, 1992) is born. Lorde described herself as “a black feminist lesbian mother poet” and sometimes “warrior.” Her first poem was published while she was still in high school. Besides poetry, she wrote essays and novels. Eventually she became a professor and was given the great honor of being named Poet Laureate of New York State. She was known to describe herself as African-American, black, dyke, feminist, poet, mother, etc. In her novel Zami: A New Spelling of My Name Lorde focuses on how her many different identities shape her life and the different experiences she has because of them. She shows us that personal identity is found within the connections between seemingly different parts of life. Lorde died of liver cancer at age 58 on November 17, 1992, in St. Croix, where she had been living with Gloria I. Joseph.  In an African naming ceremony before her death, she took the name Gamba Adisa, which means “Warrior: She Who Makes Her Meaning Known”

1938 – The film “Bringing Up Baby” with Cary Grant premieres. It’s the first time the word “gay” is used in reference to homosexuality;

The Friends of Dorothy Era and The Hayes Code

1950s The Decade the public learned heterosexual women wanted sex

02-18-1952 Efva Attling – Born in Stockholm, Sweden. She is a Swedish jewellery designer. She worked as a professional model for twelve years. In 

the early 1980s she played in the band X Models and released the hit single Två av oss (Two of Us). Attling was also famous for being one of Sweden’s best professional disco dancers. She is one of five sisters. She was married to pop singer/writer Niklas Strömstedt and has two children. She entered a civil union with Swedish pop singer Eva Dahlgren in 1996. In 2009 they got married, after Sweden passed its gender neutral marriage law.

1956

Pat Boone‘s cover version of Little Richard’s #17 hit, “Tutti Frutti”, peaks at #12 on the US Pop chart. Boone himself later admitted that he didn’t even want to record the song because “it didn’t make sense” to him.

Elvis performed at the Stage Show, CBS Studios, New York City at 8.00 p.m.

Elvis performed Tutti Frutti and I Was The One on a live tv broadcast.

LGBTQ2 Blogger Nina Notes: Not surprising since it was sexual slang. Readers of the blog can youtube the song for several versions by Little Richard who wrote and recorded it, along with Pat Boone’s bland rendering – and Elvis Presley has several versions from Hayride Recordings and TV performances that explain the Boone vs Presley fandom difference.

February 18, 1957

The live cross-continent concert tour “Biggest Show of Stars for ’57” made a stop at Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto for a show featuring Fats Domino, Chuck Berry, LaVern Baker, Bill Doggett, Clyde McPhatter, the Five Keys, Ann Cole, the Moonglows, the Five Satins, andCharlie Brown.

The Civil Rights 60s: When the Boomers were under 30

1966 – The first meeting of the coalition of 14 gay rights groups that will become the North American Conference of Homophile Organizations takes place in Kansas City, Missouri.

02-18-1969 Christopher Sieber – Born in St. Paul, Minnesota. He is an American actor. He is best known for his roles as Kevin Burke in Two of a Kind. Sieber appeared in Broadway musicals, including Into the WoodsMonty Python’s Spamalot, and Shrek The Musical. He is a two-time Tony Award nominee. He has starred in two television series: Two of a Kind with the Olsen twins and It’s All Relative. While It’s All Relative was being produced, Sieber came out as gay and said that he was, “happily partnered to actor and chef, Kevin Burrows.” They married on November 24, 2011 , in New York City. Sieber is involved with Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS and has appeared in several of its Broadway Cares revues, among other events the charity produces. He also teaches classes on drama and performance.

Feminist, Gay Liberation and Lesbian Separatists: Civil Rights

1974, Canada – Members of GATE, the Gay Alliance Toward Equality, picket the Ontario Human Rights Commission on University Avenue for inclusion of gays and lesbians in human rights protections.

02-18-1974 Jillian Michaels – Born in Los Angeles, California. She is an 

American personal trainer, reality show personality, talk show host, and entrepreneur. She is best known for her appearance on NBC’s The Biggest Loser and Losing It with Jillian. She also appeared on the talk show The Doctors. Her partner is Heidi Rhoades. They have an adopted girl from Haiti and a son, born by her partner. Michaels proposed to her girlfriend on the season finale of her reality series Just Jillian on March 8, 2016.

1978

Queen’s “We Are The Champions” remained fourth on the usa song charts, Queen’s News of the World was third on the lp. 

1979

The miniseries “Roots: The Next Generations,” starring Georg Stanford Brown, Olivia de Havilland and Henry Fonda, premiered on ABC-TV.

The Genderfuck Apathetics vs Yuppies : Aids the new STD on the list

1984

Culture Club remained at #1 with “Karma Chameleon”. 

1985 – Nancy Hamilton (July 27, 1908 – February 18, 1985) dies on this day. She was an American actress, playwright, lyricist, director and producer. Hamilton was the lifelong partner of legendary actress Katharine Cornell(February 16, 1893 – June 9, 1974). Hamilton is perhaps best known as the lyricist for the popular song, “How High the Moon.

90s: Listserves and Email distribution replaces telephone trees for activism

1990

At the 11th Brit Awards, Freddie Mercury made his final public appearance with Queen. They received the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music.

1997

Trinity Broadcasting Network, a U.S. Christian television network, cancelled Pat Boone’s weekly gospel music show, “Gospel America,” following his appearance in black leather and fake tattoos on ABC-TV’s “American Music Awards” show. Later, most fans accepted Boone’s explanation of the leather outfit being a “parody of himself,” leading to Trinity Broadcasting reinstating him and his program.

Post 9/11 – The Shock Decade From “gay and lesbian” to “lesbigay” to “Lgbt/Lgbtq/Lgbtq2”

Human Rights in global conflictTrans/Pans vs LGB/ vs Heterosexual women

2012

Whitney Houston had an invitation-only memorial at the New Hope Baptist Church in Newark, New Jersey. Among those who performed at the funeral were Stevie Wonder, Alicia Keys and R. Kelly. Kevin Costner read a moving and personal Eulogy.

02-18-2015 

Kate Brown – On this day, she became the country’s first bisexual governor. With the resignation of Democratic Gov. John Kitzhaber,

 Secretary of State Kate Brown was sworn in as Oregon Governor. She was also the country’s first openly bisexual statewide officeholder, and previously served for almost two decades in Oregon’s House and Senate. Her win in the 2016 election, made her the first openly LGBT person elected governor of any U.S. state.

2017 – Norma Leah McCorvey (September 22, 1947 – February 18, 2017), better known by the legal pseudonym “Jane Roe“, dies. She was the plaintiff in the landmark American lawsuit Roe v. Wade in 1973.  The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that individual state laws banning abortion are unconstitutional. Later, McCorvey’s views on abortion changed substantially; she became a Roman Catholic active in the pro-life movement. While working at a restaurant, Norma met Woody McCorvey (born 1940), and she married him at the age of 16. She later left him after he allegedly assaulted her. She moved in with her mother and gave birth to her first child, Melissa, in 1965. After Melissa’s birth, McCorvey developed a serious drinking problem. Soon after, she came out and began identifying as a lesbian. She went on a weekend trip to visit two friends, and left her baby with her mother. When she returned, her mother replaced Melissa with a baby doll and reported her to the police as having abandoned her baby, and called the police to take her out of the house. She would not tell her where Melissa was for weeks, and finally let her visit her child after three months. She let McCorvey move back in, and one day woke Norma up after a long day of work. She told her to sign insurance papers, and Norma did so without reading. However, she actually signed adoption papers, giving her mother custody of Melissa, and was then kicked out of the house.  The following year, McCorvey again became pregnant and gave birth to a baby, who was placed for adoption. In 1969, at the age of 21, McCorvey became pregnant a third time. She returned to Dallas. According to McCorvey, friends advised her that she should assert falsely that she had been raped and that she could thereby obtain a legal abortion under Texas’s law which prohibited abortion; sources differ over whether the Texas law had such rape exception. Due to lack of police evidence or documentation, the scheme was not successful and McCorvey would later admit the situation was a fabrication. She attempted to obtain an illegal abortion, but the respective clinics had been closed down by authorities. For many years, she had lived quietly in Dallas with her long-time partner, Connie Gonzales. “We’re not like other lesbians, going to bars,” she explained in a New York Times interview. Later in life, McCorvey stated that she was no longer a lesbian

cited sources

Today in LGBT History   by Ronni Sanlo

Today in LGBT History – FEBRUARY 18 | Ronni Sanlo

https://ronnisanlo.com › today-in-lgbt-history-february-…

Feb 18, 2019 — Today in LGBT History – FEBRUARY 18 · 1840 – Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862)was an Americanessayist,poet,philosopher, …

The Lavender Effect

canada pride

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https://lgbtdailyspotlight.com/

people link

events link

#AM_Equality: February 18, 2022 – Human Rights Campaign

https://www.hrc.org › am-equality-february-18-2022

9 hours ago — by HRC Staff • February 18, 2022 … Check out her podcast work from ‘Beyond Black History Month’: Despite racism, Black LGBTQ people …

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Our Daily Elvis

LGBTQ2 Blogger Nina Notes:

Most of the above is copied from one of the sites cited as sources in the daily post and as linked at the end of every post.

the history of nonheterosexuals and different historical eras views are such that there is a there is a danger to apply current decadish of time, in 2021 to past decades and centuries; particularly without application of complete history.

There is a difference between adopting male attire in the era when clothing was spelled out in law, and lesbians who passed in public, differ from those who only change clothing for personal sexual gratification, in private “cross dressors” in the language of this same era.

Laws regarding clothing exist in many nations, including capitol punishment, this is why sexual orientation is a demographic, That heterosexual women continue to be denied reproductive rights, education and professions, even where won at court; that women are a demographic. That male and female persons who are ethnically different from the majority population and with differing experiences being merged into colour blind visible minorities are differing demographics.

the farther back in time the given individual is, and why on this blog, there is a under theme of Elvis Presley, as the most prominent modern era person of the 1900s Current Era; who was photographed almost every day of his adult life., and who’s number of days on this planet have resulted in his being one of the most recognizable individuals across all cultures on the planet, which in 1950s was 1 billion people, and by his death almost 4 billion, to the 8 billion currently existing on earth.

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